Faith, Logic and St. Thomas Aquinas: the Great Dominican

“To say we have faith does not mean we automatically understand everything. It means we have the confidence to know God will help us understand.”

By Caroline Darrow ’21

Hello, my name is Caroline Darrow. Usually, I am the girl in the white gown sitting in the tiny chair next to Father, so you may not recognize me right now. But don’t worry I’ll be back there soon.

As I was trying to write this reflection for the Feast of Saint Thomas Aquinas, I wrote three different versions, but all of them felt like I was leading a kumbaya circle. So, I did the typical Fenwick procrastination, I did other homework instead.  Nevertheless, as I attempted to complete my pre calc homework while at the same time contemplating Aquinas, I realized it is very hard to think about faith and logic in the same instance. However, Aquinas’ own teachings can help with this conundrum.

“Logic can clarify faith, while faith can prevent mistakes of logic.”

Caroline Darrow (of Clarendon Hills/Notre Dame School)

One of Aquinas’ most influential teachings was his study of the relationship between faith and reason. Throughout time, there has been a struggle as how to combine knowledge gained from revelation with knowledge gained from the observation of the natural world around us. Aquinas viewed both of these as compatible with each other as they both had been created by God. Logic can clarify faith, while faith can prevent mistakes of logic. In other words, using our logic we are able to reason through and clarify teachings of faith in order to fully comprehend what God is trying to tell us.  Faith keeps our morals in check, while at the same time teaching us things we cannot observe through our senses, as we observe a society in which humans are susceptible to other worldly perspectives.

In addition to being a Preaching Team member, Ms. Darrow (far right) serves as an acolyte at Fenwick masses.

What does it truly mean to seek God in faith and reason? Each day, we pray before classes in which we never speak about God. You most likely won’t contemplate Catholic teachings while solving logarithms, but you will have times when you question aspects of your faith because to say we have faith does not mean we automatically understand everything, it means we have the confidence to know God will help us understand. To aid in understanding, we must combine both our faith and logic to come to the best conclusion. God has instilled faith and logic in our lives, and it is our job to find a way to follow Aquinas, embracing both ways to gain knowledge in order to follow the path God has sent us on.

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God Loves All of Us

On the Feast Day of Our Lady of Guadalupe, a Fenwick junior from Berwyn reflected about the Blessed Mother’s special connection with the oppressed, the impoverished and the powerless.

By Chelsea Quiroga ’21

Today, we gather to celebrate and honor the virgin of Guadalupe; the mother of Jesus, known to most of us as Mary. Just shy of 500 years ago the virgin of Guadalupe appeared to Juan Diego, who was an Aztec peasant who had recently converted to Catholicism, on the hill of tepeyac just outside of present day Mexico City.

She appeared with a green cloak covered in gold stars as well as having the same olive complexion of that of the native Juan Diego. She told him to build a church in honor of her, and he humbly accepted. Juan Diego went back down the mountain into town to see the bishop and informed him of his recent encounter.

Juan Diego told the bishop of Mary’s request, and the bishop was doubtful and asked for Juan Diego to bring him proof of her existence before he approved any construction. Mary appeared to Juan Diego for a second time, and she responded to his request for proof by telling him to gather the wild plants around the hill, which was very dry and desert like. She told him to put them into his tilma, which was like toga, and not to open it until he saw the bishop.

Juan Diego listened and carried the dried plants down the hill, and when he came to the bishop he let down his tilma. In the place of the dried, wild plants out fell dozens of red roses, and the image of Mary was imprinted onto his tilma. Soon after, a church in her honor was constructed. Ten years prior to her visitation to Juan Diego, Mexico had been conquered by the Spanish and Catholic conversion was pushed onto the natives.

La virgen of Guadalupe’s appearance to a native peasant caused many similar to Juan Diego to feel a sense of belonging in Catholic faith and caused Catholicism to spread like wildfire. Mary’s visitation to a poor native peasant demonstrates God’s love for all backgrounds and the special connection had with those oppressed, impoverished and powerless. Her visitation was a triumph and allowed for Mexicans and Latin Americans alike to have a personal tie to their faith and gain a strong feeling of home with God.

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