Collegiate Friars: August 2019

Catching up with two young alumni from the Class of 2017: Rachel McCarthy, recently back from Japan, and Ellis Taylor, an American footballer in NYC.

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Rachel McCarthy (shown here in Tokyo) will be a junior at Illinois Wesleyan University in downstate Bloomington.

Fenwick Graduation: 2017

Hometown: Riverside

Grade School: St. Mary School

Current School:  Illinois Wesleyan University

Current Major: English Literature and Psychology

Summer Internship: This summer I was a teaching assistant at Technos College, where I spent an unforgettable seven weeks living in Tokyo and helping English students practice conversations/interviews with a native speaker. I also did a lot of behind-the-scenes planning for the college’s annual cultural exchange event with 10 other sister universities from around the world. 

Career aspirations: I’ve looked at a few different career options in the past two years, but right now I’m exploring the possibility of being an English professor. I’ve always had an interest in academia, and my experience at Technos College taught me the joys of working one-on-one with students to help them blossom. 

Fenwick Achievements/Activities: Lawless Scholar, Illinois State Scholar, Girls Cross Country, Blackfriars Guild and Novel Writing Club co-founder.

Fenwick teacher who had the most influence on you: A better question might be who didn’t inspire me, but one teacher I do think of on a regular basis is Mr. Arellano. Though his speech class was tough, the way he cared for each and every one of his students was readily apparent, and I still think of his encouraging feedback whenever I have to give a major presentation.

Fenwick class that had the most influence on you: My junior year AP Language and Composition class was pivotal in shaping me as a writer. That class pushed me to write critically about a wide range of fascinating, real-world topics, and I loved the freedom we were given to pursue our own interests. As I prepare to spend a year studying English as a visiting student at Oxford University, my heavily annotated APLAC textbook remains a valuable guide to this day.

Best Fenwick experience/the one you would like to live again: My final cross country meet was one of the most emotional days of my life, because of the sad goodbyes and the pride in what I had accomplished with the support of my teammates.

What Fenwick experience changed you the most: Our senior Kairos trip, without a doubt. The level of trust and respect that was shown as everyone shared their stories is something that I don’t think I’d find at any other high school. To me, it was a powerful experience of acceptance and healing.

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Ellis Taylor (on campus with his mom) promises to be a force on the end of the Fordham Rams’ defensive line this upcoming football season.

Fenwick Graduation Year: 2017

Hometown: Oak Park

Grade School: Julian Middle School

College: Fordham University (New York City, the Bronx)

Major: Business Administration, concentration in Business Economics; Minor in Business Law 

Career aspirations: A job at a management consulting firm or to be a lawyer.

Fenwick Achievements/Activities: two years of basketball; three years of football (sophomore team captain, senior year team captain); one year of Track and Field.

Fenwick teacher who had the most influence on you: Mr. Perry was my English teacher for three of four years while at Fenwick. Through all of the papers written and work done in the class, my writing far improved over my four years. As someone who has to use writing on a daily basis, I would honestly say that this class improved my skills greatly and put me in a great position for college-level writing.

Fenwick class that had the most influence on you: Mr. Mulcahy’s World Religions class really had an impact on me because this was the first time I was taught about worldwide religions, which was very eye-opening to me to learn about different cultures other than my own.

Best Fenwick experience/the one you would like to live again: The 2016 state-semifinal football season was one of the best times of my life; being able to play my final season and have great success with some of my best friends for the last time. Although it didn’t end the way we wanted it to, this was one of the best times of my life.

Fenwick experience that changed you the most: Overall, just playing sports at Fenwick gave me some great experiences that I will remember for the rest of my life. Even if you don’t play sports, I’d recommend branching out and joining a club or team at Fenwick because the experience will be worth it.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? MORE “COLLEGIATE FRIARS”

Faculty Focus: August 2019

Getting to know Science Instructor and alumna Elizabeth Timmons ’04, who is entering her ninth year of teaching at Fenwick.

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Ms. Timmons spends a big chunk of her summer down in the Friars’ pool, coordinating swimming lessons for the Oak Park community.

What is your educational background?

I have a B.S. in Environmental Science with minors in Spanish and Anthropology from Santa Clara University. I also have a MAT degree in Chemistry from Dominican University.

What did you do prior to becoming a teacher at Fenwick?

I completed several outdoor education internships that included working at a National Wildlife Refuge in CA, an outdoor education center in Northern Michigan (through the winter!) and the Max McGraw Wildlife Foundation in Dundee, IL. I also subbed in the elementary schools in Forest Park and River Forest while I was getting my Master’s and teaching credentials.

What are you currently reading for enjoyment?

Sadly, it has been a while since I have read anything other than parenting articles online, but my goal is to finish Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming this summer. We will see how that goes with a one-year-old running around!

What interests do you pursue outside of the classroom?

I like to spend time with my family and be outside as much as possible. I love to go to the Morton Arboretum or the zoo, especially with my one-year-old. I love to swim and play water polo, even though I know I’m not very fast these days.

To what teams and/or clubs did you belong as a student?

I was a member of the Varsity Swimming and Water Polo teams. I was also a member of NHS.

Which clubs/sports/activities do you run at Fenwick?

I am the moderator of the Environmental Club and I have been involved in the all of the Aquatics programs in various ways over the years.

What quality/characteristic marks a Fenwick student?

The quality that most stands out to me in our Fenwick students is their resourcefulness. Our students here are very ambitious and constantly looking to successfully meet objectives and expectations. They will find extra resources when they need them and are willing to put in the hard work required to excel in the classroom.

Fenwick students also look out for each other. The Fenwick Community is a place that is always welcoming, regardless of how long ago you were a student. The Fenwick Community is strong, and I have always felt that we pull together to celebrate the triumphs and work through the trials. The statement, “Once a Friar, Always a Friar” is definitely true.

When did you decide to become a teacher, and why did you choose this field?

I like to say that I went into the family business, but I guess that’s not technically correct since we don’t own a school or anything. Both of my parents were teachers, so I got to see some incredible examples of what it means to be passionate about what you are doing every day while I was growing up. My dad [Hall of Famer the late Dave Perry] taught at Fenwick and my mom taught at Morton East for most of their careers. I started babysitting, teaching swim lessons and coaching at a young age, so I always wanted to teach in some form. As things worked out, I made my way back home and am now enjoying teaching at Fenwick.

What personal strengths do you find especially helpful in your teaching?

I have a desire to see those around me happy and successful. I work really hard to make my class a place where each student can experience successes that they can be proud of, even if they are not going to continue to study chemistry.

I am also a perfectionist, so I work really hard to foresee issues that might arise before they happen and try to do whatever I can to prevent those issues. This can definitely work against me, though, as I can get stressed when things don’t go according to my plan. Having a one-year-old is definitely helping me decrease my perfectionist ways and the stress I allow this to have in my life, because nothing ever goes according to my plan these days!

What are your favorite classes to teach?

I have loved teaching chemistry at the CP (college prep) and Honors levels for the past eight years. I have learned so much from my students and love to see how far they come during the course of the year. That being said, I am really excited to take on the new adventure of teaching AP Environmental Science this year. I majored in Environmental Science and it has always been my greatest passion (with Chemistry a close second) so I can’t wait to start this new journey with my students.

What is the greatest success you have had in teaching?

My biggest successes are always when I get to witness that ‘ah-ha’ moment in my students. This is especially cool for students who have been struggling through a topic and then it just clicks all of a sudden. I also love to see the transition for a student who comes into my class and doesn’t really enjoy science, but leaves wanting to study more science. Those are the most powerful experiences in teaching for me.

What challenges face students today?

The ease at which they can get information. Google is an amazing thing, but sometimes it takes the work out of doing research and, if we are not careful, we might stumble upon information that is not peer reviewed or is based on opinions/emotions instead of facts. We must always remember to have a critical eye when researching and make sure there is enough evidence provided. In addition, we must remember that the most important things are the ones worth working for, so push through when the going gets tough!

MEET MORE FENWICK FACULTY MEMBERS!

Collegiate Friars: July 2019

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OLIVIA EVANS

Fenwick Graduation: 2018
Hometown: La Grange, IL
Grade School: St. John’s Lutheran
Current School: The University of Wisconsin-Madison
Current Major: Animal Science (Pre-Vet)

Summer Internship: I do not have a formal internship through the university this summer, but I work as a groom for a few Argentine polo pros. I gain experience through working with the horses as well as by assisting the vet when the horses need treatment. I am also involved in a biomedical research lab at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This lab work will extend through my entire undergraduate schooling.

Career aspirations: I aspire to go to go to vet school.

Fenwick achievements/activities: I was a member of the National Honors Society, Tri-M Honors Society, Friar Mentors, was an Illinois State Scholar, a Eucharistic minister and was on the State Team for WYSE. I also ran track for three years and was in choir for four years.

Fenwick teacher who had the most influence on you: Mr. Kleinhans had the most influence on me. I learned a great deal in his physics class, but most of all I learned from his example as a role model, teacher, mentor and WYSE coach. Some of my favorite class memories are from his “feel good Fridays” where he connected life experience to prayer and the importance of being a genuine person while working hard and enjoying life.

Fenwick class that had the most influence on you: AP Biology with Mr. Wnek was one of my many favorite classes. Mr. Wnek is a fantastic teacher, and what I learned set me up for success in college biology and other lab work.

Fenwick experience you would like to live again: I would relive the whole experience. From classes, sports and clubs, to friends, I had a great experience at Fenwick. I am extremely grateful for the community and for the way it set me up for success in college and in the future. I am thankful for the relationships I formed with teachers and the way that impacted my growth as a student and as a person.

Fenwick experience that changed you the most: My entire time at Fenwick changed me. Living by four pillars — community, service, spirituality and study — set the atmosphere for success and encouraged me to be my best self. I will never take for granted the opportunity and special community at Fenwick.

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JAKARIE GATES

Fenwick Graduation: 2016
Hometown: Chicago
Grade School: St. Malachy
Current School: Morehouse College (Atlanta)
Current Major: English
Summer Internship: Steans Family Foundation – North Lawndale Reads
Career Aspirations: Public Relation Specialist/Social Media Manager

Fenwick achievements/activities: Honor Roll, Poetry Club, Kairos Leader, Kairos Rector

Fenwick teacher who had the most influence on you: The teacher who had the most influence on me was Raymond Kotty. I never had a class with him, but every week after school of my sophomore year he would help me study for my math tests. If my grades slipped I risked losing my scholarship, but Mr. Kotty made sure that never happened. I was beyond insecure in my ability to comprehend certain concepts, but he saw something in me I did not see in myself. Mr. Kotty helped make me feel like I belonged at Fenwick.

Fenwick class that had the most influence on you: Mr. O’Connor’s English Class my senior year had the most influence on me. He was a tough grader and even gave me an F on a project for not citing my sources correctly. At the time I was really upset, but it was the greatest thing he could have done for me. His class taught me how to think critically and was the foundation of my passion for English literature.

Best Fenwick experience: My best Fenwick experience was the day I was sick in Spanish class. My teacher was writing notes on the board, and I was taking notes in my notebook. I asked to go to the nurse’s office and the teacher said, ‘After you finish taking notes.’ My classmate, Abbey Nowicki, saw me struggling and took my notebook from me and said, ‘I will take your notes for you. Go to the nurse’s office.’ When I came back after the bell, my notebook was on my desk and it had all the notes written in the notebook. It was the sweetest gesture anybody had done for me at Fenwick. It always stuck with me. 

Fenwick experience that changed you the most: The experience that changed me the most at Fenwick was Kairos. It taught me not to take the important things in life for granted: love and appreciation. Kairos made me appreciate time more.

MORE COLLEGIATE FRIARS

FACULTY FOCUS: Fenwick Theology & Film Teacher John Paulett

Renaissance Man: Clevelander, Golden Apple winner and Fenwick Theology/Film Teacher for the past 12 years, Mr. Paulett also is a writer, musician and theater aficionado.

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Mr. Paulett enjoying his vacation in Paris, France, this summer.

What is your educational background?                  

JP: My undergraduate degree was in Linguistics and Classical Languages from Georgetown University. I have a Master’s degree in Theology from Felician University and an MFA in Creative Writing from Antioch University. During my Golden Apple Sabbatical, I began a doctoral program in religious studies at Northwestern University.

What did you do prior to becoming a teacher at Fenwick?

JP: I taught for 10 years while I was in my twenties — at Lake Catholic High School in Cleveland and then at Kent State University, where I was doing doctoral work in theater and film. I then left teaching for family reasons and went into business. I had planned to work in business for two years but it turned into 25 years. I had always planned to return to teaching. When my daughter was through college, I had my opportunity and joined Fenwick.

What are you currently reading for enjoyment?               

JP: I always have several books going at the same time. Right now, I am reading David Brooks’ new book The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life. I am also reading a history of the Second World War in the Aleutian Islands. Rounding that out is Wasn’t That a Time? — the story of the folk singing group The Weavers. 

What interests do you pursue outside of the classroom?

JP: I am a theater fanatic. In most weeks, I attend two or three performances. I love opera and subscribe to the Lyric Opera. I also subscribe to the Chicago Symphony, the Music of the Baroque and three theater companies. I fill in the other nights with smaller theaters and films at the Gene Siskel Center. I am a writer (I have four books published) and am active writing almost every day. I have a new book in progress that I hope to finish by fall. I play music (guitar, banjo, mandolin) and usually pick up an instrument for a few minutes every day.

To what teams and/or clubs did you belong as a student?

JP: When I was in high school [at St. Ignatius in Cleveland], I was a member of the Debate Team and was fortunate to have some success. I was also in the theater. I acted in several plays and, during my senior year, wrote and directed a play. I sang in the choir and played in a rock band. I was a dreadful athlete and got cut from every sport I attempted. I wrote for the school newspaper and, for a while, published an underground newspaper. The teachers caught me running this off on the mimeograph machine and the paper was ended.

Which clubs/sports/activities do you run at Fenwick?

JP: I have moderated a variety of groups at Fenwick. I was the chess coach and the moderator of Touchstone [the student literary magazine] for several years. I directed the spring musical and was music director for Banua. I have been the moderator of the Photography Club for the last few years. Next year, I will guide the new Film Club.

What quality/characteristic marks a Fenwick student?

JP: Fenwick students generally have a seriousness of purpose that sets them apart. I teach Moral Theology. In that class, we study philosophers such as Kant, Bentham and John Stuart Mill. Most students will not encounter these thinkers until junior year of college. Fenwick students deal with this advanced content with thoughtfulness and diligence.

When did you decide to become a teacher, and why did you choose this field?

JP: I was deeply affected by several teachers in high school, probably none more than my speech teacher Mr. William Murphy. He was an intense, rigorous and sometimes difficult man who drove, excited, demanded and inspired his students. I suppose that my desire to become a teacher started with a hope to be like Murph. I have been very blessed in my life, and I think I have an obligation to give back. Teaching has been the best way I have found to return what I have been given.

What personal strengths do you find especially helpful in your teaching?

JP: Parker Palmer, who writes about teaching and teachers, has said that success in the classroom comes from the identity and integrity of the teacher. I was able to study with Parker for two years. One of the things that I learned from him is that teachers need to be authentic and vulnerable. I care deeply about every one of my students. I hope they see that. I try to be creative and innovative. I like using technology to create a more participatory class environment. I also try to bring my sense of humor into the classroom. Most of all, I love my subjects. I try to make my passion for the content material open enough to engage and embrace my students.

What are your favorite classes to teach?

JP: The class I teach most often in Moral Theology. I think this course is both important and interesting because it challenges the way we think. It asks important questions such as, “What is truth?” and “Are some things actually good and bad, or is it just a matter of opinion?” I also teach History and Theory of Film. This is a special joy. Many people watch movies; only a few enter into the beautiful art of cinema. My students are exposed to the classics of film along with the cinema of many different countries. This gives them a chance to expand and increase their ability to enjoy all types of movies at a fuller and deeper level.

What is the greatest success you have had in teaching? ​

JP: On an external level, the greatest success was being awarded the Golden Apple for Teaching Excellence in 2013. It was a thrill that is difficult to describe. Bigger and more important successes happen every day. When a student says, “I never thought of that before,” I have succeeded. This year, a film student told me that he had been certain he would not like a Japanese film we were studying. After our discussions, he said that it was now his favorite film. Whenever a student is transformed, I count it as one of my greatest successes.

What challenges face students today?

JP: The speed of change is greater than anything experienced in the history of the world. Thomas Friedman claims that the year that changed history is 2007. He cites the iPhone, cloud computing and social media as a few of the substantial changes that happened that year. Our students are facing changes that rival or exceed the Industrial Revolution, but they are seeing them more quickly than any generation before them. I once asked an executive at Google what he was looking for in new employees. He answered, “Creativity and collaboration.” Students need to achieve flexibility and [have] an ability to learn — often to learn skills and information that did not exist just a year or so earlier.

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Mr. Paulett took an Eiffel Tower selfie in June!

FACULTY FOCUS ARCHIVES

Faculty Focus: Science Teacher Mr. Tom Draski

Science Teacher Tom Draski retired earlier in June. The biology fanatic, tennis coach and longtime Catholic Leaguer has spent the last 21 years of his career in education at Fenwick.

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What is your educational background?

TD: I have a bachelor of science degree in biological sciences [from Southern Illinois University] and a master of science degree in biology [from Chicago State University].

What did you do prior to becoming a teacher at Fenwick?

TD: I have always been a teacher and coach. I began my teaching/coaching career at St. Laurence H.S. where I taught biology and human anatomy/physiology. I started as the frosh/soph boys’ tennis coach and six years later became the varsity boys’ tennis coach. I came to Fenwick in 1998 where I have taught amazing students in biology and human anatomy/physiology. I have had the pleasure to coach both the boys and girls’ frosh/soph tennis teams. I was the Varsity Scholastic Bowl coach at Fenwick from 1999 to 2011. I have coordinated the Fenwick Quetico trip and the Fenwick Willis Tower stair walk fundraiser.

What are you currently reading for enjoyment?

TD: I tend to do more reading in the summer. The books I have read in the last few summers that I have enjoyed have been The Devil in the White City, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, The Shack, Mrs. Magrady’s book Lines and The Alchemist.

What interests do you pursue outside of the classroom?

TD: I love to do things outside. I enjoy gardening, camping, visiting state and national parks, and playing tennis. I also enjoy the creativity of cooking. I never use recipes.

To what teams and/or clubs did you belong as a student?

TD: As a student at De La Salle, I was involved in intramurals, the camera club, student government and, naturally, the Science Club.

Which clubs/sports/activities do you run at Fenwick?

TD: I have for 21 years, and still, coach the girls and boys’ frosh/soph tennis teams. Each year they provide excitement and great satisfaction. I have been able to bring the Quetico trip experience to Fenwick. Over the years I have taken hundreds of Friars to experience true nature.

What quality/characteristic marks a Fenwick student?

TD: I have been so impressed with Fenwick students. They strive for excellence in the class and in athletic competition. Students learn the great traditions of Fenwick. I have enjoyed my time with Fenwick students who are friendly, teachable and receptive to change.

When did you decide to become a teacher, and why did you choose this field?

TD: Interestingly, a freshman in one of my classes asked that question a few months ago. My reply was that I thought teaching would be fun. There was no follow up question to my answer. Later, I relayed this story to Mr. Groom. He asked me the right follow up question. “Has it been fun?” My answer was a big “YES.” I have always enjoyed the stimulation of teaching in the class, in the labs, and on the tennis courts. I still do. When students and athletes can see you have a love and passion for what you do they respond with the effort they need for success. If you love what you do, you will never have to work a day in your life. Teaching and coaching have been magic.

What personal strengths do you find especially helpful in your teaching?

TD: I love to get excited for every topic I teach and coach and show passion in my teaching. Every class, every year, has been a chance to teach and coach a new story, to an inquisitive audience. Some days have been diamonds, some days have been stones. I strive to be fair, and teach for success.

What is your favorite class to teach?

TD: Definitely biology! It is what our lives are about. I want my students to understand they are citizens and stewards of our planet. We can control our health and affect the health of others around us. I hope my students understand that we are not alone on our planet, but together we make up a beautiful tapestry of life.

What is the greatest success you have had in teaching?

TD: When my students have experienced success when I encouraged them to think. I ask many questions in class as I teach. The answers to those questions are not as important as having my students think about possible answers. My students should not be afraid of a wrong answer, as they should know they can learn with a right or wrong answer. I encourage my students to reach conclusions on their own, then they can experience success on their own. I love and appreciate the personal notes I have gotten from students and athletes over the years. Whenever I read them, they inspire me and remind me of my humanity.

What challenges face students today?

TD: I believe my students face a challenge and crisis involving technology. I hope they can find a balance between the benefits of information and the potential negativity of social media. They need to not lose the value and importance of interpersonal communication skills. They need not be afraid to have a willingness to lead rather than follow. They should never be reluctant to challenge themselves.

Since you are retiring from teaching this year, are there any thoughts or words you would like to share with the Fenwick community?

TD: Over the years, I have met amazing students, wonderful parents and caring faculty. Being able to work with two of my closest friends, Mr. Arellano and Mr. Sullivan, has been a thrill. I appreciate all the support and help I have gotten from the parents of my tennis teams and parents of my students. Being able to teach and coach girls after spending decades at an all-boys school has been a highlight of my teaching and coaching career.

I have shared with various groups what I think are the most important seven words we can say. Use them often in your life. I share them now with you. “I’m sorry.” I’m sorry for any time that I have wronged you. “Thank you.” Thank you all for the wonderful memories you have given me about Fenwick and its community. “I love you.” I love you all for making my life such a happy one. And from my favorite poem, “The Winner:” “… sooner or later the person who wins, is the person who thinks they can.”

READ ABOUT OTHER FACULTY MEMBERS

Catching Up with Former English Teacher Peter Bostock

Retired for more than 10 years now, Dr. B looks back with fondness at the three decades he spent at Fenwick.

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Dr. Bostock and his wife in Sorrento, Italy.

DHow many years were you at Fenwick (and when)?

I was at Fenwick from 1979 until 2008: 29 years. When I arrived at the hallowed halls I thought I’d dropped into heaven (compared to the previous two years of my teaching life).

What was your role / what classes did you teach?

I was assigned to teach freshman English in ’79. Mr Duane Langenderfer (‘Derf’) and I shared the freshman English between us: four classes each in Room 1 with about 30 students in each class. The emphasis was on grammar, writing and English literature.

Much to my disappointment, the Head of the English Department assigned me to teach two sophomore and two senior classes the following year. I was disappointed because I’d had such a wonderful year I figured my ‘heaven’ would continue with freshmen. (Ah, man proposes and God disposes!)

From then until my retirement I was ‘stuck’ with two soph and two senior classes; those two latter eventually becoming two AP sections of English. However, for several years after Fr. Landmesser’s retirement I was Head of Department, so I can blame only myself for my schedule.

Were you involved with any extra-curricular activities? (If so, which ones?)

Meanwhile I was engaged in a variety of extra-curricular activities, the most bizarre of which was when I was asked to run the computer club for a year (in those days computers were few and far between; there were no computer labs in the school, and the so-called ‘club’ had one old Apple C and an old mainframe kind of machine that no one knew how to use. As for the moderator of the club, he/I was totally computer illiterate anyhow.) I think that was in 1985-86.

In ’79-’80 I was the moderator of the Debate Team, another area where I was ‘somewhat’ competent.

Fortunately, Dan O’Brien, Master i/c Athletics and Sports, invited me to start a soccer program in ’81. And my extra-curricular career took off! Much to the chagrin of the head of cross-country, [as] almost all his runners opted to play soccer. So Fenwick had a varsity soccer team; we didn’t belong to the Catholic League, so all our games were ‘friendlies.’ We tied one game and lost all the others. But we had fun. In year two a volleyball coach was assigned to help me with the program, and we joined the League. I think we won one game and tied another, so we made huge progress.

Then Fr. Bernacki allowed me to give up extra-curriculars so I could write a dissertation for my PhD (Fordham University had informed me that I had to write a diss or ‘get lost.’ So I wrote.) Thereafter (’82 thru 2008) I became a jack of all trades: back to frosh soccer for a while, several years moderating the year book, several the student newspaper, and finally girls’ frosh soccer. To say I had a blast would be an understatement. The many girls and boys with whom I was lucky enough to come in contact graced my life in ways that they will never know. But I thank God and Fenwick for the privilege of having been with them and known them.

For a couple of years in the early ’80’s I organized the Easter UK literary jaunt, staying in London, Bath and Banbury. A good time was had by all. And I hope we appreciated the historical and literary sights and sites.

How do you describe the Fenwick Community to other people?

Talking with others, including former students, Friars I meet who were at Fenwick years before I arrived, I always mention the ‘aura’ of the place. It’s the feeling that the Dominican Order, the teachers, the students and the parents have created over the years. It’s not simply one element. It’s an awareness that all at Fenwick have: we may not be able to pin it down in words, but it’s a kind of excellence of spirit — intellectual, athletic and spiritual.

What do you miss (most) about Fenwick?

I miss learning; MY learning. I learned much from my students. A small example: one day we were reading Hamlet in class, the students taking the actors’ parts. A female student reading the part of Gertrude emphasized a line of her speech in a way that shed a completely new light on Gertrude’s character. It was an insight I had not witnessed in any of the famous dramatizations I’d ever seen (not even in the play directed by Derek Jacobi and starring Kenneth Branagh in the title role that I saw in Manchester; Jacobi was in the audience four seats to my left). I forget the name of the student, I forget the line, but I have never forgotten the experience.

I also miss reading English literature. In 10 years of retirement I find that I’ve taken to reading a lot of science and mathematics: The Calculus Diaries, Fermat’s Last Theorem, Six Easy Pieces, In Search of Schrodinger’s Cat, The Fly in the Cathedral, The Emperor’s New Mind, etc. I’ve just gone where my interests have taken me, and I suppose after 49 years of reading ‘literature’ my mind needed a break from poetry and fiction. But I do miss Keats, and Chaucer, and Bill.

Funniest Fenwick moment?

I was coaching the frosh girls’ soccer team at the Priory. The field was sodden, it was raining and I attempted to show the players how to chip the ball. Only wearing smooth sneakers, I took a quick run at the ball and landed flat on my back in the mud. Girls rushed forward to ask ‘Are you okay, coach?’ Of course I was okay. But later going over the incident in my mind, I thought, ‘If that had been the frosh boys’ soccer team, they’d have stood there giggling at me.’

Fondest Fenwick moment?

At the final Commencement in 2008 when Dr. Quaid announced my retirement, the whole senior graduating class rose to their feet applauding. Sitting among them, I was shocked, amazed, surprised, flabbergasted, not to say embarrassed. But it was a fine feeling to be honored thus.

Do you have any words of wisdom for current students?

Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero = “Be the best you can be;” all the rest is fruh.

Any wise words or advice for the present faculty, staff or administration?

Far be it from me to preach, but … teaching is the process of opening minds, not (force) feeding them.

And Fenwick is a Christian institution, so follow Christ’s rules: Love God and love your neighbo(u)r. Period. Shibboleths from the Old Testament should have no part in a Christian community.

What are you doing now? How do you spend your time?

Good question. Nothing. I’m trying to do nothing, and I’m becoming very adept at it. Other than that, I try to ride my bike about 15 miles daily in the forest preserves that surround us here in Wheaton. And as a member of Morton Arboretum I can cycle there, though the “hills” are a real challenge to my beer belly. Our local church has a cycling group called the Holy Spokes and I ride with them every Saturday in summer (Chicago weather permitting) — about 20 miles.

Bostock_canoe

Dr. B (left) canoeing with a friend last summer on the Kishwaukee River.

DI obviously read, not a lot. But we do attend the monthly lectures at Fermi Lab (a couple of miles down the road), which delve into the more arcane aspects of quantum physics and science in general. Much of the science is “above my head,” but I like the challenge to think (especially outside the box).

We have memberships to the Buffalo Theatre Ensemble (they perform on the stage at the College of DuPage where we go with Pat Foys, who also used to teach at Fenwick, though for only a few years); to the Chicago Symphony (we joined them on the picket line a couple of weeks ago and shook hands with Maestro Muti, my Italian/American wife’s hero); and to the Chicago Art Institute. And I’m a fanatic Manchester City fan (which many of my former students know, having bought for me a Man City poster when they were in London with Mr. Finnell in ’08), so have been able to watch them play on the telly these last few years. Needless to say “sky blue” is my favo(u)rite colo(u)r. Coz God made the sky, right?

So, I guess I’m busier than I thought. “Ciao” to all my former students, players, Friars. I miss you, though I do have some contacts on Facebook or via email. And remember, if you meet me in a bar, the first ‘pint’ is on me (as the Brits say).

PS – The original meaning of fond, English scholars? Don’t tell me you don’t remember!

Alumni Friars Teaching in Academia

It’s “cool” to be smart at Fenwick, and these Ph.D. scholars have taken their intellectual talents to a higher level as university professors.

By Mark Vruno

Fenwick instructors have honed developing minds of highly intelligent people over thecourse of 90 school years. From physics and politics to English and French, some of those students took their passions for learning to the next level by pursuing research, education and scholarship at some of the world’s most prestigious private and public universities.

Holder Hall at Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, where two Fenwick alumni teach.

At Princeton, the Ivy League research school with New Jersey roots dating back to 1746, two Fenwick alumni-turned-professors can be found teaching on campus: Thomas Duffy ’78 (geophysics) and John Mulvey ’64 (operations research/financial engineering). In Boston, Professor William Mayer ’74 has been a political-science guru at Northeastern University (established in 1898) for the past 28 years. After Fenwick, Mayer attended Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, from which he also earned a Ph.D. (in 1989). “I don’t like to move,” he dead-pans, “plus my wife loves the New England area.”

On the West Coast, one of Prof. Duffy’s classmates, Larry Cahill ’78, is a neuroscientist and professor in the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior at the University of California at Irvine. And in the Midwest, Robert Lysak ’72 is professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis – Saint Paul.

Additionally, two members of the Class of 1961 were college professors and are now retired: Terrence Doody (English Literature) at Rice University in Houston and Thomas Kavanagh (French), most recently at Yale University in Connecticut. Another Professor Emeritus isJohn Wendt ’69, who taught Ethics and Business Law at the University of St. Thomas (Minnesota) for 30 years. (Read more about them.) Spread out geographically across the United States, Fenwick is the common denominator for these seven Ph.D.’s and college professors. Read on for a glimpse at their impressive works.

A Computing Love Affair

John Mulvey in 1964.

John Mulvey is a professor within Princeton’s Operations Research and Financial Engineering (ORFE) Department, which he founded. He also is a founding member of the interdisciplinary Bendheim Center for Finance as well as the Statistics and Machine Learning Center at the university. Mulvey is captivated by the ongoing revolution in information and machine-learning. The ORFE Department focuses on the foundations of data science, probabilistic modeling and optimal decision-making under uncertainty. “Our world is a very uncertain place,” he stresses.

The work Mulvey does has applications throughout the service sector, including in communications, economics/finance, energy/the environment, health-care management, physical and biological sciences, and transportation. In the past, he has worked with aerospace/defense-technology firm TRW (now part of Northrop Grumman) to help solve military problems, including developing strategic models for the Joint Chiefs of Staff (U.S. Department of Defense).

“Today we work with major firms, including some of the largest investors in the world, which are interested in integrating their risk,” Mulvey explains. For example, “hedge funds and private-equity firms need to manage their portfolios over time to protect themselves. When the crash occurred in 2008, people thought they were diversified. The banking and finance world refers to systemic risk as contagion,” which is the spread of market changes or disturbances from one regional market to others.

Mulvey also analyzes data for supply-chain management, which he calls a “transformative industry. Production and distribution models were separate before,” he points out, “but we’ve brought it all together now. Amazon has built its whole system based on this commerce model.”

Prof. Mulvey at Princeton.

Machines running algorithms and computer optimization became passions for him at a relatively young age. At Fenwick, Mr. Edward Ludwig helped mathematics to make sense for young John. “He was an amazing math teacher,” Mulvey says of Ludwig. “His class was fantastic. I didn’t necessarily want to be an engineer but felt I could go into a technical area.

“In the 1960s we were at the cusp of computing, and the University of Illinois had one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers at the time,” recalls Mulvey, who grew up on the West Side of Chicago and attended the old St. Catherine of Siena Parish. “That’s why I wanted to go there, and I fell in love with computing.”

The ILLIAC IV supercomputer is what drew Mulvey to the University of Illinois in the mid-1960s.

He next ventured west to study business administration at the University of Southern California (USC) and the University of California (Cal), then earned a second master’s degree in management science in ’72 from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Three years later Mulvey completed his Ph.D. at UCLA’s Graduate School of Management. His dissertation topic, “Special Structures in Large Scale Network Models and Associated Applications,” won the 1976 American Institute of Decision Sciences Doctoral Dissertation Competition.

Mulvey taught for three years at the Harvard Business School and, 41 years ago, came to Princeton “to have an impact at a smaller school,” he says. (Princeton has some 5,200 under-grads.) “I came here to grow the basic, general engineering program for undergraduates.” The 72-year-old thoroughly enjoys his work: “If you had a job like mine, you wouldn’t want to retire.”

Extreme Conditions

Tom Duffy in 1978.

Across campus, Tom Duffy is Director of Princeton’s High-Pressure Mineral Physics & Material Science Laboratory and Associate Chair of the Geosciences Department. His research focuses on understanding the large-scale physical and chemical behavior of the Earth and other planets through experimental study of geological materials under extreme conditions. He and his colleagues employ high-tech tools, such as laser-heated diamond anvil cells and optical spectroscopy along with X-rays, to explore crystal structures, phase relations, elasticity and deformation behavior in a range of materials at ultra-high pressure and temperature conditions.

“We study the behavior of materials under extreme conditions – deep inside the Earth, for example, or under meteorite impact,” Prof. Duffy explains. “We examine how structures and chemistries change, then try to determine what these changes might mean for Earth and for other planets, including recently discovered planets orbiting other stars.” One big question with which he and his research associates grapple: How are these newly discovered planets fundamentally different from Earth?

Prof. Duffy (third from left) poses with students in his research group. (Photo courtesy of Princeton University.)

The youngest of six children from Riverside, IL (St. Mary’s), Duffy describes his career pathway as “roundabout.” He entered Boston College as a physics major. “I then was exposed to real- world applications through a geology course I took as a senior, then came home and worked in a food distribution warehouse,” Duffy says. After about one year he returned to school for his master’s degree at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in a new program that blended his interests in physics and geology. After six years at California Institute of Technology (Cal Tech) in Pasadena, earning a Ph.D., he returned home to pursue a research opportunity at the University of Chicago. In 1997 Duffy landed at Princeton and has never looked back.

Duffy travels “home” to Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, IL, about six times per year to conduct research. He credits Fenwick with developing his self-confidence as a young man who wasn’t necessarily science oriented. Mr. Andrew Arellano was a newer teacher back then, and Duffy got involved in speech and debate. “At tournaments we’d go up against bright, hard-working kids from other schools. You wouldn’t think that possessing strong writing and speaking skills are important in science, but they are. I have to write well and explain complex concepts.

History Teacher Mr. Louis “Jack” Spitznagel (shown in 1974) passed away in late 2001.

“I received a broad-based education at Fenwick — history, literature, math, art,” he continues. He remembers other “great teachers” who were dedicated to their craft: Fr. McGrath for math, Mr. Guerin for physics and Mr. Polka for biology. The late “Mr. Spitznagel was really tough,” Duffy recalls, “but I learned a lot” in his history class.

Sex Differences in the Brain

In high school in the mid-1970s, Larry Cahill was a self-described “little, smart guy with glasses” who everyone assumed would grow up to be a physician. “I rode in from Elmhurst with my brothers,” he recalls of his 12-mile daily commute eastward to Oak Park. Cahill’s father and uncle also attended Fenwick.


Larry Cahill in 1978.

“To show you what a ‘geek’ I was, I took Latin partly to get an advantage regarding medical terminology,” Prof. Cahill admits. Mrs. Mary Ann Spina was his Latin teacher. “She made learning Latin enjoyable,” he says. “As a matter of fact, some Fenwick friends and I started a philosophical group called ‘In Vino Veritas,’ which even had business cards (thanks to my Dad, a printer). I suppose the organization still lives, since philosophy never dies,” Cahill quips.

Despite being on the med-school track, “by default,” Cahill discovered brain research as an undergraduate student in Evanston at Northwestern University (NU). “I needed to stay in state to get Illinois state scholarship money,” he reflects. At NU he continued to study Latin and spent a semester in Rome his junior year. “Life works out in funny ways,” he believes. “That [trip] was the benefit of taking Latin back at Fenwick.”

While in college, the idea of medical school faded. After working on memory-enhancing drugs at G.D. Searle in Illinois for two years, Cahill earned his Ph.D. in neuroscience in 1990 from the University of California at Irvine. Following post-doctoral research in Germany, he returned to UC Irvine to extend his research to studies of human subjects, which in turn led to discoveries about sex influences on emotional memory and revolutionary findings regarding sex influences on brain function, which he finds quite gratifying.

Prof. Cahill at UCI. (Photo courtesy of Orange County Register/Drew A. Kelley.)

For the past 18 years or so Cahill has been immersed in the differences between the male and female brain. “We used to believe that men and women were not so different outside of the ‘bikini zone,’” he says. But research is proving that women and men are very different in other ways, too: “The female heart, lungs, liver, immune system and brain are not the same as the male’s,” he informs, adding that medical research has been built disproportionately on studies of male organs and brains. “Women have not been treated equally because they have been treated the same,” he asserts.

Cahill is a leading advocate for the need to study biological sex differences in all of medicine. Adversaries have called him a “neurosexist.” “There has been enormous resistance,” he admits. His findings have been featured in the New York Times, London Times, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, medium.com and Quillette, an Australian online magazine focused on science, technology, news, culture and politics. On television, he has been interviewed by PBS, CNN and CBS. (Cahill’s “60 Minutes” piece was highlighted on “The Colbert Report.”) At the lecture podium, he has been recognized as an Outstanding Professor at UCI’s School of Biological Sciences in 2005-06 and in 2007-08.

Other than playing tennis as a senior, Cahill says he wasn’t very involved in extra-curricular activities as a Friar. “But I still know the words to the Fight Song,” he proudly declares. He remembers Fenwick as “a serious place at all levels. This whole attitude of seriousness was imbued on high school kids from the top down, including the concept of discipline – which is much maligned today — and self-discipline. One of the best things you can teach anyone is to suck it up and make it happen.”

“I learned more at Fenwick than I did at Harvard.”

– Prof. Bill Mayer ’74

A Political Voice

Prof. Mayer at Northeastern University (Boston).

Every four years, Bill Mayer’s phone rings more than usual at Northeastern University in Boston. Members of the media seek out his expert commentary during U.S. presidential election years. “I’ve done a lot of research and writing on that topic,” he admits. Reporters from the Boston Herald, Newsweek and the Christian Science Monitor have quoted Mayer. You can see him on videos aired by C-SPAN (the Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network), too.

Fielding such calls is a natural for Mayer, whose forte is American politics. After graduating from Fenwick in 1974, Mayer earned a B.A. in government in ’79 from Harvard, where he finished up his Ph.D. in political science 10 years later. Prof. Mayer’s tenure at Northeastern began in 1991. Under his American government specialty, he has taught introductory classes as well as courses in “American Political Thought,” “Public Opinion, Voting and Elections” and “Politics and the Mass Media.” Next spring, leading up to the 2020 election, he again will teach his favorite course while the U.S. presidential nomination process is taking place.

“I’m grateful for the teachers I had at Fenwick,” says Mayer, a native of River Forest, IL, and St. Luke Parish & School. His older brother, Joseph Mayer ’73 (both were valedictorians), paved the way to Fenwick. “Joe helped me so much, especially with math,” says Bill. “I really owe a lot to him.” (The older Mayer brother became a medical doctor and presently is a neurologist with DuPage Medical Group.)

Bill Mayer as a Fenwick junior in 1973.

Young Bill served as editor of The Wick student newspaper for one semester and was on the Debate Team all four years as a Friar student. “I did well in debate,” he reports. “We advanced to the semi-finals of Catholic Nationals my senior year.” His debate partner was a junior, John McSweeney ’75. “Our coach was Father Motl for my first three years, then Mr. Arellano took over.”

In addition to teaching, Mayer is an accomplished author as well. He has published two of his own books, co-authored two other books, and edited and wrote chapters for seven other publications. He also has contributed some 50 scholarly articles to academic publications. (See “Alumni Authors.”) In the “Acknowledgements” section of his first book, The Changing American Mind (1992), Mayer thanks three of his teachers at Fenwick:

  • The late Fr. Jordan McGrath, O.P., who passed away last August at age 86, was his math teacher “for three of my four years. He taught me how to think rigorously,” says Mayer, who points out that he taught statistics earlier in his career.
  • Mr. John Heneghan “was a wonderful history teacher who taught [us]… how to take raw materials and try to interpret how they fit into the larger sweep of American history.”
  • Former English Teacher Mr. James Kucienski was “really good at passing along ideas about the teaching of literature,” Mayer says. “I had him my senior year.”

Additionally, Mayer is grateful for taking four years of Latin (two were required at the time). “Latin is a great way to learn about language,” he contends, “because it is constructed in a different way than English, where meaning is determined by word endings rather than position in the sentence. It, therefore, makes you much more conscious of noun cases and verb tenses.”

English Teacher Mr. James Kucienski was Fenwick’s resident grammarian, which Mayer says he didn’t appreciate at the time.

With the benefit of hindsight, he also now realizes how important freshman English class was to a youthful, 14-year-old Friar. “Our grammar textbook was thick, and the study could be tedious: subject-verb agreement, dangling participles and so forth. These disciplines are not terribly popular today, but I hope they still do it at Fenwick.

“I’ve always been regarded as a good writer,” he adds, attributing that reputation to his high school grammar instruction. “Trust me: There are some poor writers among political scientists!” Truth be told, “I learned more at Fenwick than I did at Harvard,” Mayer concludes.

The Northern Lights Man

Bob Lysak in 1972.

Bob Lysak, a professor of physics and astronomy, is interested in Theoretical Space Plasma Physics, especially magnetospheric physics, auroral particle acceleration, the dynamics of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves in the magnetosphere, magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, and the dynamics of field-aligned currents. He is fascinated by aurorae: the natural light displayed in the Earth’s sky; the phenomenon also is referred to as polar lights or northern lights (aurora borealis).

This infatuation is, perhaps, part of the reason why he has been located for the past 37 years at the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, which are four latitudinal degrees north of his hometown of Westchester, IL. “I’m a glutton for winters,” jokes Lysak, who attended Divine Infant Parish as a child. This past semester he was on sabbatical in Australia, collaborating on southern lights (aurora australis) research around the Antarctic and designing computer models of the Earth’s magnetic-field oscillations.

After graduating from Fenwick in 1972, Lysak enrolled at Michigan State (earning a B.S. degree in three years) and then at the University of California at Berkeley, where he received his Ph.D. in physics in 1980. His post-doctoral studies, conducted near Munich, Germany, focused on extraterrestrial physics.

Prof. Lysak at the University of Minnesota.

Recognized among his peers for making significant scientific contributions to society, the professor was selected the by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) as a 2011 Fellow, a designation conferred upon fewer than 0.1% of all AGU members in any given year. The European Geosciences Union also awarded Lysak the Hannes Alfvén Medal, which honors scientists who have achieved exceptional international standing in Solar-Terrestrial Sciences.

When he reflects on his time at Fenwick some 50 years ago, Lysak points to two non-scientific events that positively affected his illustrious career:

  1. Serving as editor-in-chief of The Wick student newspaper, where “I learned to write to a deadline.” (English Teacher and alumnus Mr. George Wendt ’65 was the moderator.)
  2. Participating in stage plays as part of the Blackfriars Guild, where “I was in front of people and talking.” Lysak, who has been lecturing for nearly four decades, adds that he took part in Debate & Forensics, run by Fr. James Motl, O.P. “but I wasn’t very good.”
Former Fenwick Math Teacher Mr. Ed Ludwig in 1964.

Lysak and his Honors Math classmates were taught all four years by the aforementioned Mr. Ludwig, who had a reputation among students as a somewhat stern disciplinarian. “It was early-1970’s turmoil,” he laughs. “We had our issues, but we developed a good relationship. During our senior year we worked on problems and asked a lot of questions. Mr. Ludwig encouraged us to go at our own pace and [to] explore.” Also influential was Science Teacher Fr. Dave Delich, O.P., who would “let us hang around the lab after school and ‘play’ with the equipment.”

All of these experiences taught Lysak valuable lessons and skills, as did commuting: “I got used to taking public transportation and buses,” he says. “St. Joe’s was less than a mile from our house, but I had a pretty good academic record in grade school and wanted to go to Fenwick. It was worth it.”

Oops, Did We Miss Someone?

The seven professors highlighted here only scratches the surface of Fenwick alumni in academia. If you know of an alumnus or alumna who has a Ph.D. and/or is a college professor, tell us about him or her!

Please email names and titles to communications@fenwickfriars.com.

More PhD.’s from Fenwick

Continuous Learning for Fenwick Faculty and Staff

In-house Professional Development, which began in earnest during the 2016-17 school year, helps our teachers sharpen their skill sets.

By Mark Vruno

Starting in the fall of 2016, Fenwick’s administration implemented its own Professional Development (PD) program for faculty and staff. The ongoing teacher education program is spearheaded by Assistant Principal Laura Pendleton and Digital Learning Specialist Bryan Boehm.

Ms. Laura Pendleton, Assistant Principal

“At Fenwick, through the Dominican pillar of study, we do an excellent job of instilling the value of life-long learning in our students,” says Ms. Pendleton, who also is the Orchestra Director at school. “The in-house professional development program was created out of the need to provide opportunities for our faculty to spend time in community learning new skills and sharing expertise with each other. It has grown a great deal in its first three years and, in the future, will serve to be a space for our faculty to continue to work together to model life-long learning and exhibit their own love of learning to our students.”

Mr. Bryan Boehm, Digital Learning Specialist

Mr. Boehm adds, “Fenwick students are always being challenged to learn new ways of gathering information and data. Our faculty need to have the same experiences to be our leading force in their fields and subjects. Peer-led courses have been great for teachers to learn from one another and collaborate,” he continues. “Offering new perspectives, new experiences and alternative ways to teach the material that they have so much success with over their career will only benefit the students.”

Math Teacher and sophomore football assistant coach Matt Barabasz is one of four PD faculty leaders. Last year he conducted a session about how teachers can “flip” their classrooms. This technique “allows the students to watch and learn at home, while we then use instructional time to engage in meaningful conversations and applications. This session went into detail on how I use this process within my mathematics course, when applicable,” explains Mr. Barabasz, who came to Fenwick two years ago from St. Patrick High School in Chicago.

Contemplation: Golden Apple-winning Theology Teacher and Fenwick blogger John Paulett (center) inquires about a tech topic at a March 8 break-out PD session.

This school year one of his sessions is how to use Google Forms to facilitate parent communication. “Families are incredibly important within a student’s learning process,” Barabasz acknowledges. “Without the support of families, we as educators cannot fully unlock a student’s potential. This series went into how I communicate regularly with parents using Google Forms and how I keep the parents in the loop, on a weekly basis, on their students’ progress.”

Kudos from faculty participants

Now in its third year of customized PD, the faculty/staff sessions at Fenwick are wide ranging and run all year long on most Tuesdays and Thursdays, either at 7:30 a.m. or during lunch periods. Required to attend at least three sessions per academic year, most teachers seem to be buying into the idea. “I feel that the PD sessions are a great opportunity for a teacher to learn new ideas and strategies on how to become more effective,” says Spanish Instructor and alumnus Jim Reardon ’86. “Fenwick teachers are willing to share their time, knowledge and expertise with other faculty members. The sessions are not very long [about 25 minutes each] but allow you the opportunity to learn and develop new ideas.”

Spanish Teacher and Fenwick alumnus Jim Reardon.

Mr. Reardon add that he has taken PD sessions on Schoology, the learning-management system employed by Fenwick, as well as on EdPuzzle, which is a way to employ video technology in the classroom. “The PD sessions allow a teacher to better understand a topic, and then it is up to him or her to further develop their understanding and usage of the particular topic,” he notes.

English Department co-worker and alumna Theresa Steinmeyer ’12 attended Pendleton’s series on William Bender’s Strategies for Increasing Student Engagement as well as some sessions on ways to further incorporate technology into instruction. “As a new faculty member at Fenwick [2018], I have enjoyed these opportunities to continue growing as an educator while getting to know colleagues from other departments,” Ms. Steinmeyer says.

More than 20 PD sessions have been conducted this school year on topics such as:

  1. Schoology Refreshers – Bryan Boehm
  2. Schoology Gradebook Refreshers – Mickey Collins ’03
  3. Magnus Health System – Donna Pape (School Nurse)
  4. Apple Classroom – Tim Menich
  5. Classroom Management with Technology #1 – Alex Holmberg ’05
  6. Fall Book Club – Laura Pendleton
  7. Individual Educations Plans (IEPs) Level 1 – Grace Lilek David ’08
  8. CleverTouch Interactive Displays – Fr. Mike Winkels
  9. Tips & Tricks in Schoology #1 – Holmberg
  10. Dealing with Difficult Conversations – Pendleton
  11. Google Forms for Parent Communication – Matt Barabasz
  12. Learning Differences – Kyle Kmiecik ’00
  13. iPad Basic Maintenance / Troubleshooting – Boehm
  14. Assessment Strategies Through Schoology #1 – Holmberg
  15. IEP Level 2 – David
  16. Writing Across the Curriculum – John Schoeph ’95
  17. Pythonista for iPad & iPhone – Dave Kleinhans
  18. Tips & Tricks in Schoology #2 – Holmberg
  19. Science PD Series
  20. EdPuzzle – Brian Jerger
  21. Classroom Management with Technology #2 – Holmberg
  22. Assessment Strategies Through Schoology #2 – Holmberg
  23. iPad Basic Maintenance / Troubleshooting Level 2 – Boehm

In early April, Barabasz led a session on using “Google Forms for Class Data Collection” while Math Dept. colleague Kevin Roche ’05 is coordinating the Spring Book Club. Pendleton and Boehm then wrap up this school year with “Differentiated Instruction” and “Apple Classroom Level 2,” respectively.

PD Leader Mr. Alex Holmberg (at right, Fenwick Class of 2005) helps to “train” social studies colleague Brian Jerger.

“I try to run sessions with practical take-aways for teachers to immediately use in their classrooms, regardless of subject area or grade level,” explains fellow PD leader and Social Studies Dept. Chair Alex Holmberg ’05, who also is Fenwick’s Director of Clubs and Activities. “I’ve also tried to tailor specific PD sessions to address needs brought up from our end-of-year iPad Survey last school year. One of the positive aspects of the model of PD that we use is that it allows teachers to present on topics that they see as learning opportunities in their classrooms throughout the school year.”

“It has changed the way I manage my classroom.” – Brian Jerger

Participant and fellow Social Studies Teacher Brian Jerger adds: “The Apple Classroom presentation by Tim Menich has afforded me an easy, hands-off deterrent that has helped curb iPad abuse/distractions in class. It has changed the way I manage my classroom.”

Mr. Brian Jerger teaches U.S. History and Western Civilization at Fenwick.

Mr. Jerger, who joined Fenwick in 2017, also enjoyed Laura Pendleton’s Book Club presentation. “It provided a setting for teachers to come together and discuss the interesting methods, techniques and philosophies we all utilize in our classrooms,” he says. “In that same vein, I think the greatest benefit of the Professional Development series is it exposes the faculty to all the interesting work we are doing in the classroom that we do not normally get to see from each other. Due to all the ways in which teachers are pulled and stressed for time (and our humble natures), it is incredibly easy for us to get trapped in our own individual silos leaving us unaware of the great work our colleagues are doing. The Professional Development series pulls back that curtain, to some degree, and allows us to share some of this great work with one another.”

Continue reading “Continuous Learning for Fenwick Faculty and Staff”

Dominican Formation Among Fenwick’s Faculty and Staff

While students sleep in, instructors and school administrators reflect on the spiritual side of their teaching ministry.

By Brother John Steilberg, O.P.

During the course of the school year, the faculty and staff at Fenwick participate in Dominican Formation Days. These late-start dates for students are an opportunity for the faculty and staff to reflect on who we are as a Catholic and Dominican school. Dominican formation stems from our need for ongoing education and formation in Catholic values vital to the mission of our school. We would like to share some thoughts shared by our faculty and staff after attending our most recent Dominican formation day in February.

One faculty member commented, “Dominican formation helps us better understand the Dominican tradition central to our school identity and helps us strengthen community with one another.” Another faculty relayed these sentiments: “It is important for us to participate in Dominican formation so that we can continue to grow spiritually as a community and to continue to remind us of our mission.” Another stressed the need to extend our mission to how we live, teach and preach here at Fenwick every day. “I would see the purpose as continuing to reflect on how we can best understand and live out our Catholic Dominican identity in specific ways.”

Dominican formation centers on the Four Pillars of Dominican Life:

  1. Prayer
  2. Study
  3. Community
  4. Preaching

The Four Pillars are a descriptive way of explaining the essence of and daily practice of Dominican life. The Dominican friars here at Fenwick live out the pillars in a very intentional way and oftentimes in a very external way. But all of our faculty and staff, in a wide diversity of actions, live out the pillars as part of their particular Christian vocation.

“Our job at Fenwick is to do more than teach and support academically, but to show through our actions the meaning of Christ’s love.”

One teacher described this shared mission of both the Dominican friars and the staff in this way, “As teachers, we must be able to model the Dominican Catholic values of the school.” Another teacher asserted, “Also, to remind us that our job at Fenwick is to do more than teach and support academically, but to show through our actions the meaning of Christ’s love.”

The Fenwick Community

Campus Ministry Director and proud alumnus Fr. Dennis Woerter, O.P. ’86 (with his back to us) co-led the Dominican Formation Day with Br. Steilberg, O.P.

Each year, our Dominican formation programs focus on one of the four pillars in particular. This year we reflected on “community,” how we are called by God to live together as Christian people. As a community, we discussed questions such as:

  • What is the most important thing we do that brings us together as a community?
  • What issues divide us at times?
  • What items do we need to work on?

We also examined where are the margins of our community are and how we can bring the gospel message to those margins. Our conversation was heartfelt and lively around these difficult questions.

What Makes Fenwick Different?

In later meetings we discussed our identity as a Catholic school. What makes us different, being Catholic and Dominican, from other schools in the area? One teacher explained it this way: “Every school prepares its students to lead, achieve and serve. Not every school’s mission is predicated upon a deep theological commitment to the dignity of the human person.” One faculty member explained, “to be Catholic is to be counter-cultural. Our identity and our values need to be true to who we are — even though that may not be popular or generally accepted.”

“Not every school’s mission is predicated upon a deep theological commitment to the dignity of the human person.”

Brother John
Brother John

We then discussed how to avoid going too far in emphasizing what makes us different, so that we can preach Jesus’ universal message of the gospel that is meant for all of mankind. This can be a challenging balance: to be true to our Catholic identity yet open to diversity, welcoming to all people, and proclaiming God’s mercy available to every person.

Finally, we discussed where God is in this picture here at Fenwick. Faculty members expressed this idea: “God is [present] in relationships with other people, with our students and our colleagues.”

As we strive to build a faith community, what does that say about what we believe about God? What is God asking of us, as a faith community, as a high school? These are challenging questions. These are questions that may take a lifetime to answer. But that is what we are about here at Fenwick. We seek the Truth.

Continue reading “Dominican Formation Among Fenwick’s Faculty and Staff”

‘Death to Self:’ Bishop Barron’s Calling Began at Fenwick

By John Paulett, Fenwick Theology Teacher

Editor’s note: Monday, January 28, is the feast day of Saint Thomas Aquinas, priest and doctor of the Catholic Church and patron of students.

Three years ago Bishop Barron (left) reconnected with Fr. Thomas Poulsen, O.P., his former teacher at Fenwick.

Readers interested in exploring the excellent videos of Bishop Robert Barron, the recipient of the Lumen Tranquillum Award from Fenwick High School this year, might start with the short presentation he gives on the man he describes as his hero: St. Thomas Aquinas. The bishop explains how it was at Fenwick, when he was 14 years old, that a theology teacher first introduced him to St. Thomas Aquinas. He describes it as a “bell-ringer” event and goes on to explain how it changed the course of his life. He seems to suggest that this seminal moment led him, through the grace of God, into the priesthood.

Besides his description of the encounter in his freshman theology class, there is another deep Fenwick link in Barron’s explanation of Aquinas. He lists three ideas, which he believes characterize the thought and teaching of Thomas. It is interesting to note how closely the three themes he describes resemble three main ideas characteristic of a Fenwick education. Many high schools talk about the “grad at grad,” or what a graduate will know and be. I would suggest that these three concepts, reflective of the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas, might be a good description of a Fenwick student after four years on Washington Boulevard.

Bishop Barron first explains in the video that Aquinas believed there was one truth. He explains that people of Thomas’s time (we might note of our time as well) often thought there were two truths — scientific and religious. Aquinas refused to accept that. He knew that there could be only one truth. If science and religion seemed to be in conflict, there was a problem in either the scientific or the theological method. More thought and study were required.

‘Dominicans are not afraid of reason; we embrace it.’

Barron calls St. Thomas Aquinas his hero.

At Fenwick, we sometimes express this same idea as, “Don’t leave your brain at the door of the church (or the theology classroom.)” It is a characteristic of Dominican education to apply rigorous study and thought to every aspect of our education, including our religious belief. We are not afraid of reason; we embrace it. We are convinced that reason and critical examination will lead to the Creator, not contradict creation.

And so we teach Fenwick students to question, to wonder, and to apply the lessons they learn from science and philosophy to their faith. Bishop Barron reassures us that Aquinas had no fear of reason. Neither should we.

Radical Humanism

Secondly, Barron describes the Thomistic understanding that we are contingent beings. This is a fancy way of saying that we depend on something else for our existence. That thing that is the First Cause, what does not depend on anything else for its existence, is what we call God. It was this explanation of the Proofs of the Existence of God that first rang the bell of 14-year-old Bob Barron. [A Western Springs resident, he transferred to Benet Academy in Lisle.]

I often say to myself, “There is a God and it is not me.” When we recognize that we are dependent on a power beyond ourselves (12-step programs would call it a Higher Power,) we are on the path to faith. We begin this journey with the destruction of self-centeredness and ego. Christian theology calls it “death to self.” In the gospel of John, Jesus tells us, “Unless a grain of wheat falls into the ground and dies, it remains alone. But if it dies, it produces great fruit.”

Continue reading “‘Death to Self:’ Bishop Barron’s Calling Began at Fenwick”